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Practical Grace: Living the Faith We Say We Believe (Romans 12)

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Practical Grace: Living the Faith We Say We Believe (Romans 12)

After spending the first eleven chapters in the book of Romans articulating the revelation of God’s grace, the Apostle Paul turns his attention to the believer’s right response to God’s grace. The gospel of Jesus Christ, he says, transforms every area of a person’s life. This transformation occurs when the Spirit of God takes the Word of God and activates it inside the child of God—affecting our heads, our hearts, and our hands. For surrendered believers who yield to the Spirit’s work in their lives (“living sacrifices”), the mind is renewed, the heart is warmed, and the hands are energized to do what God wants. This is practical grace, where the rubber of theology meets the road of reality, and it leads to grace-inspired transformations that show up in our families, our work, our schools, and our local churches. Romans 12 begins the practical section of Romans, and it calls the church to let our orthodoxy be seen in our orthopraxy—that is, to let our good beliefs be seen in our good behavior. (Twitter Hashtag: #PractGrace)

After spending the first eleven chapters in the book of Romans articulating the revelation of God’s grace, the Apostle Paul turns his attention to the believer’s right response to God’s grace. The gospel of Jesus Christ, he says, transforms every area of a person’s life. This transformation occurs when the Spirit of God takes the Word of God and activates it inside the child of God—affecting our heads, our hearts, and our hands. For surrendered believers who yield to the Spirit’s work in their lives (“living sacrifices”), the mind is renewed, the heart is warmed, and the hands are energized to do what God wants. This is practical grace, where the rubber of theology meets the road of reality, and it leads to grace-inspired transformations that show up in our families, our work, our schools, and our local churches. Romans 12 begins the practical section of Romans, and it calls the church to let our orthodoxy be seen in our orthopraxy—that is, to let our good beliefs be seen in our good behavior.

Twitter Hashtag: #PractGrace